Tips and Tricks for Smoking Cessation
I have never met anyone who has smoked for several years who declares that they enjoy smoking or that they could quit anytime they wanted. Nothing could be farther from the truth. Studies have shown that nicotine addiction is as hard to break as heroin or cocaine addiction. This article will focus on tips and techniques to help smokers kick the habit. After reading this article and if you are a smoker, you will have suggestions to help get the nicotine monkey off your back.

There are two phases to successful smoking cessation:

Phase one is getting help and assistance.
Phase two is staying smoke-free and not relapsing as so many quitters have done in the past.
Phase One-Getting Help

The most successful quitters are those who get help and plenty of it. Sadly, eighty percent of smokers who quit do so without being in any program. Many studies have shown that 95% of these self-reliant quitters fail, and go right back to smoking a short time later.

That’s the bad news. The good news is that most smokers can successfully kick the habit if they recognize that they can’t do it alone. Your past failures are not a lesson that you are unable to quit. Instead, they are part of the normal journey toward becoming a nonsmoker.

Successful quitters buy a “How to Quit Smoking Book”, or a motivational cassette tape program in a bookstore, and listen to the tapes in your car. Next, there are help groups in most communities including New Orleans. The American Cancer Society, or the American Lung or Heart Associations have inexpensive and effective, smoking cessation programs. The National Cancer Institute’s Smoking Quitline, 1-877-44U-Quit, offers counseling by trained personnel.

Other top of the line, physician-endorsed methods include nicotine replacement and Zyban. The nicotine patch or gum are now available at any pharmacy without a doctor’s prescription. The anti-depressant Zyban and nicotine inhaler do require a doctor’s prescription.

Recently the FDA approved a new medication, Chantix, which was designed to inhibit a part of the brain that is responsible for the addiction to nicotine. As a result the medication reduces a smoker’s nicotine addiction, as well as decreasing the craving for cigarettes and diminishes the withdrawal symptoms for those who decide to go cold turkey.

Chantix is given twice a day for 12 weeks and then an additional course of 12 weeks of medication is recommended to increase the likelihood of long-term abstinence and to reduce the urge to smoke.

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